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Eli Greenspan is Manager of Government Relations, ML Strategies, in the firm’s Washington, DC office. Prior to joining ML Strategies, Eli was a legislative correspondent for US Senator Martin Heinrich (D-NM), where his experience included health care, education, child welfare, social security, food assistance, and poverty issues specifically as they relate to the Affordable Care Act, Medicare, and Social Security.

This week, Republicans will ramp up efforts to pass a tax reform package. We should also get signs that a year-end spending deal is coming together. How things play out this week — both inside and outside the Beltway — will have implications for taxes, health care, and funding the government. For the complete preview, please click here.

Following weekend passage of the Senate tax bill, we return this week with Congress needing to pass a government-spending bill. While it’s widely expected that this will be a two-week continuing resolution (CR), giving lawmakers time to hash out a long-term deal, a short-term extension still requires Democratic votes since spending measures can be filibustered (e.g., October 2013). So, after the acrimonious tax debate, the pressure is on Republicans to construct a two-week spending measure that does not provoke Democratic opposition. You can read about this, as well as the interplay between the tax bill and year-end health policy negotiations, by clicking here.

Congress has its work cut out for itself between now and the end of the year. Between addressing the programs that constitute the Health Care Minibus, funding the government, and tax reform, there are also questions related to a market stabilization package (Alexander-Murray), the 340B program, the opioid epidemic, and another hurricane relief package. For the complete December preview, please click here.

It’s all about tax reform in Congress. This week, the House will look to pass its version of tax reform while the Senate begins marking up its package. Meanwhile, the end of the year is fast approaching and there are number of issues, including the health care minibus, that will need to be addressed. How Congress juggles the competing priorities and deadlines will be on display this week. You can read about this and more in the preview by clicking here.

The CHIP Reauthorization fight heads to the Senate where it faces an uncertain path forward as neither side can agree on payfors and the Senate Finance Committee focuses in on tax reform. While the Trump Administration is reportedly preparing an executive order that would eliminate the individual mandate, they are in a holding pattern to see if it gets included in the tax reform package. We cover that and more in our preview, which you can view here.

As the calendar turns to November, pressure continues to grow in Congress to pass a CHIP extension and address outstanding minibus extenders. Also on the radar is the first open enrollment period under the Trump Administration and the implications this could have for other policy issues. For the complete ML Strategies preview, please click here.

As Part of an ongoing series, we have previously provided details on the structure, funding, and evaluation of the Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood, Home Visiting (MIECHV) program, Medicare therapy caps, and community health center funding.  This post marks is the first in an exploratory series illuminating the structure, funding, and outlook of the Special Needs Plans (SNPs).  Additionally, drawing on potential riders affected by the current health care minibus, the “minibus” refers to a handful of policy provisions tied together in one piece of legislation. Undoubtedly, this minibus will carry a number of provisions into law. The number of riders who will be on board when the minibus leaves the station remains to be seen. However, as Congress gears up for a mega-package in December – including the debt limit and the budget – there is the potential to incorporate the minibus and/or a health care stabilization package. Continue Reading Special Needs Plans: A Minibus Rider

As a part of our ongoing blog series we have provided details on the structure, funding, and outlook of several expiring health care provisions, that we’ve referred to as the health care minibus. The minibus includes all of the health care extenders left behind from the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA). Health care extenders refer to a number of temporary policies that need reauthorization or annual appropriations, including but not limited to, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program, community health center funding, therapy caps, special needs plans (SNPs), and Medicaid disproportionate share hospital (DSH) payment reductions.

In this post we will discuss Medicaid DSH funding cuts and recent activity to address such cuts. Continue Reading Disproportionate Share Hospital Payments: A Minibus Rider

Over the past month, we provided additional details on the structure, funding, and evaluation of the Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood, Home Visiting (MIECHV) program and Medicare Therapy Caps. In this post we will go into detail on the structure, funding, and outlook of the “primary care cliff,” and specifically the three programs relating to community health centers. This is part of an ongoing series we are doing on the potential riders of a health care minibus. The “minibus” refers to a handful of policy provisions tied together in one piece of legislation. This minibus will carry a number of provisions into law, although the number of riders onboard the minibus, and when the minibus leaves the station, remains to be seen.  Continue Reading Community Health Center Fund: A Minibus Rider

UPDATE: Shortly after this post went live, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced that he would be delaying the vote on the Better Care Reconciliation Act until after the Fourth of July recess.  Stay tuned for further updates and analysis from the team at ML Strategies!

The Senate bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act is currently being poured over by Senate Republicans and their staff, but the early prognosis for a vote this week is not good. Senate leadership had set a goal of voting on this legislation – known as the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) – before the Fourth of July recess, which means by this Friday. However, calls for more time to review the bill as well as concerns over certain key provisions – like those touching Medicaid – may stall Senate progress at a critical moment for health care repeal efforts. Here’s where things stand: Continue Reading Capitol Hill Update: Affordable Care Act Repeal on the Ropes?