Timing is everything.  In yesterday’s post on 340B, I stated in closing:

There is still one more shoe to drop.  On May 4, 2018, the U.S. Court of Appeals heard oral arguments in the expedited appeal of American Hospital Association v. Azar, challenging the 30% CMS Medicare Part B OPPS reimbursement cut for many outpatient drugs purchased through 340B.  We are all awaiting that decision. 

Within hours the Court of Appeals issued a ruling in which it upheld the lower court’s dismissal of the lawsuit on jurisdictional grounds.  The Court found that because the original case was filed in advance of processing any actual claims under the new reimbursement formula, any challenge was theoretical in nature.  The plaintiffs needed to have actual claims that were submitted and processed under the new reimbursement formula, and exhaust any administrative appellate rights on those claims, before a court challenge can be filed and heard.  Continue Reading Court of Appeals Weighs in on 340B

It seems like every week, there are multiple new developments in the 340B program.  While it has just been a few weeks since my last 340B blog post, since that time we have had another Senate hearing, a new GAO Report, a new House hearing, and introduction of more than a dozen new bills in Congress.  But why, despite all these developments, does it feels like little has actually changed in the 340B world since January?  Continue Reading July 2018: Where Are We Now With 340B?

On Wednesday May 9th, I was floored when the Administration released the Spring 2018 Unified Agenda of Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions, which contained this nugget: by December 2018, HRSA will publish its 340B Omnibus Guidance. Readers of our blog know that, as we predicted, this so-called Mega-Guidance was withdrawn in January 2017 without ever seeing the light of day. Within a day, the Unified Agenda was reposted with references to the so-called 340B Mega-Guidance removed, and HRSA acknowledged that its inclusion in the Unified Agenda was an error. The 340B Guidance remains shelved.  Continue Reading Last Week in 340B: the Revival [not] of the 340B Mega-Guidance, Another Senate Hearing, and the Trump Blueprint to Lower Drug Prices

This week, the House Energy & Commerce Committee will hold its second round markup of opioid-related legislation. While they remain on pace for passage by Memorial Day, the timing will be determined by how smooth the markup this week goes. Additionally, Ways & Means is also considering a markup of four large packages of opioid legislation. Anything the House passes will have to go to the Senate. In other words, the June work period seems more likely for significant action in this space.

Additionally, the Administration is moving ahead with its drug pricing initiative. While the initial reaction was skepticism, the Administration would not have put the initiative in writing if they didn’t mean it. As the key players continue discussing the various proposals, understanding where the Administration has the authority to act and how it could impact what you do is key to staying ahead of any proposals that gain traction. We cover this and more in this week’s health care preview, which you can find here.

On Friday, after weeks of delay, the President finally delivered his Drug Pricing Speech and released the HHS Blueprint detailing the Trump Administration’s plan to lower drug prices and reduce out-of-pocket costs.

The speech made pointed attacks on “the middlemen” and drug lobbyists. President Trump even called out Secretary Azar’s past role as a drug company executive when calling out drug companies’ role in high drug prices. Continue Reading President Trump Delivers Much Anticipated Drug Pricing Speech

There are now multiple proposals in the House and Senate for substantive changes to the 340B Drug Discount Program. The odds of a legislative “fix” to 340B are increasing. But independent of congressional action, is CMS signaling that additional changes to 340B may be coming?

The most significant recent change to 340B came courtesy of CMS, not HRSA. Effective January 2018, CMS, relying on its authority over the Medicare Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS), effectively cut Medicare Part B reimbursement for 340B drugs in the hospital outpatient setting by almost 30%.  Most hospital and ambulatory surgical center reimbursement for Medicare Part B 340B drugs went from the standard ASP plus 6%, down to ASP minus 22%. Accompanying the new OPPS rule, CMS issued Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), discussing the mandatory use of modifiers when billing 340B drugs under the OPPS.  While the OPPS rule implementing the payment reduction is the subject of ongoing litigation, to date the Medicare Part B payment reduction remains in full force and effect.  Continue Reading Will CMS Drive Further Changes to 340B?

Mintz Levin and ML Strategies will host the 3rd Annual Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Industry Summit on May 8, 2018!  This year’s summit will take place in Boston and we are thrilled to announce that Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker will be the keynote speaker.  The Summit brings together stakeholders and thought leaders to discuss current hot topics facing manufacturers, PBMs, payors, pharmacies, and other providers.  This year’s Summit will include sessions on:

  • The evolving drug supply chain – distruptor models and the Amazon effect
  • Addressing drug pricing and supply chain economics – government investigations and ERISA litigation
  • The uncertain state of the 340B program
  • Government enforcement targeting financial relationships
  • Combatting the opioid crisis

For additional information on the Summit, including the full agenda and registration information, please visit our event website.

In January 2018, in the wake of the publication of the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Review of the 340B Drug Discount Program, I wrote that it was too soon to know whether 2018 will be a game-changing year for the 340B Program. In sum, there were just too many moving parts to discern whether there was a path forward for legislative change.

Multiple bills are now on file proposing substantive changes to the 340B Program. And the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions (HELP) convened its first hearing on the 340B Program. There seems to be a rallying cry for “transparency” in the 340B Program.

So three months into the year, are things any clearer? Now may be a good time to take a step back and recap where we are and what the future may hold for 340B.  Continue Reading The Uncertain State of the 340B Program: Where Are We Now?

This week, Congress returns to Washington with 11 days to finalize a government spending bill. Standing in the way are a number of unresolved health care issues, including drug pricing and market stabilization. There are a number of moving parts that will begin to come together this week. Also on our radar screen is the ongoing marketplace issues in the state of Idaho, where the federal government is urging the state to consider short-term limited duration insurance plans. We cover this and more in the health care preview, which you can find here.

Today, the White House released its FY 2019 budget proposal, outlining its policy priorities for the fiscal year. In health care, the President’s budget focuses on prescription drug pricing and opioid funding. It included a number of legislation proposals relating to Medicare Part D, as well as the creation of a Medicaid demonstration allowing states to test new financing structures to cover prescription drugs. The proposal also discusses the future of the Affordable Care Act, including the Medicaid expansion, as well as appropriating cost-sharing reduction payments for FY 2018 through the end of calendar year 2019. Proposals in the budget that are regulatory in nature are certainly items worth monitoring since its likely they would be approved and implemented under this Administration.

We cover this and more in the budget analysis, which can be found here.