On August 17, 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that it had reached a $465 million false claims settlement with Mylan, the manufacturer of EpiPen, over the company’s alleged underpayment of Medicaid Drug Rebates for EpiPen. The settlement amount and terms were generally announced by Mylan in October 2016 – but back then DOJ refused to confirm the settlement.

Back in October 2016, we theorized that the announced “settlement” was likely a handshake deal, not yet reduced to writing and not signed off on by the necessary parties.  It’s not surprising that it would take ten months to finalize a health care false claims settlement.  In Ellyn’s government days, she worked cases that took years, not months, to get from handshake deal to announced settlement.

And in reviewing the EpiPen settlement and related unsealed documents, there were things we expected to see in the settlement; admittedly we are grizzled veterans when it comes to false claims settlements.  But there were some things about this settlement that raised our eyebrows. So we will (briefly) recap how we got here and the settlement terms, and discuss the four things that surprised us about this settlement.  Continue Reading The Four Things That Surprised Us in the EpiPen False Claims Settlement

A court in the Southern District of New York (“SDNY” or the “Court”) recently released an important decision applying the Supreme Court’s landmark Escobar ruling to a qui tam action involving percentage fee arrangements for billing agents.  Among other claims, the City of New York (“the City”) and its billing agent, Computer Sciences Corporation (“CSC”) allegedly used an illegal incentive-based compensation arrangement for CSC’s services when billing New York Medicaid for services provided to eligible children under New York’s Early Intervention Program (“EIP”).   EIP provides “early intervention services” to certain children with development delays using federal funds provided under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.  EIP allows municipalities like the City to pay providers directly for EIP services and then seek reimbursement from other payors, like third party payors and New York Medicaid.

Continue Reading Implied False Certification Theory Fails in FCA Case Against Billing Agent

Last week, Mintz Levin’s Health Care Enforcement Defense Group published a new Qui Tam Update, which analyzes 21 health care-related False Claims Act qui tam cases unsealed in May 2017, and the findings include:

  • long delays in unsealing remain the norm;
  • relators overwhelmingly consisted of current and former employees (and physicians); and
  • the most common alleged violation was billing fraud (which was claimed in two-thirds of the 21 unsealed cases).

Also of note in this Update:

  • The targeted entities in these 21 cases included outpatient medical and psychological providers, laboratory testing companies, inpatient hospitals, and home health care providers.
  • Of the 21 cases, the government intervened, in whole or in part, in seven cases and declined to intervene in 10.  (Intervention status could not be determined from the docket in four cases.)
  • The cases were filed in 17 different courts (including the Central District of California, the District of South Carolina, the Eastern District of Michigan, and the Northern District of California).

This Update provides in-depth analysis of three of the unsealed cases, which involve allegations regarding (1) “up coding” by a hospital that allegedly billed routine transport as emergency transport, which was reimbursed at a higher rate; (2) billing for medically unnecessary tests that purported to identify susceptibility to opioid addiction and engaging in a kickback scheme; and (3) processing prior authorization requests for MCOs using automated procedures to expedite processing and circumvent medical necessity determinations, resulting in submission of false claims.

Continuing its annual tradition, the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) announced last week the largest ever health care fraud enforcement action by the Medicare Fraud Strike Force.  As part of the national health care fraud takedown, the government charged 412 defendants with approximately $1.3 billion in alleged fraud. In addition to these charges, HHS Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) is in the process of excluding 295 health care providers from participating in federal health care programs.

Continue Reading DOJ and OIG Announce Largest Ever National Health Care Fraud Takedown; Focus on Opioids

Earlier this month, the Office of the Inspector General for the Department of Health and Human Services (“OIG”) published its Semiannual Report to Congress covering the period from October 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017.  The report describes OIG’s work and accomplishments during the 6-month reporting period. Like other OIG reports, including the annual OIG Work Plan, the report gives a good indication of priority areas for OIG and can help guide compliance priorities for providers.  Below are some highlights of the report in the following focus areas: Continue Reading OIG Publishes Semiannual Report to Congress

The latest installment in the ongoing saga over EpiPen Medicaid Drug Rebates came on May 31, 2017, when Senator Charles Grassley issued a press release stating that between 2006-2016 taxpayers may have overpaid for EpiPen by as much as $1.27 billion, “far more” than the announced-but-never-confirmed or finalized $465 million DOJ settlement with Mylan.

To understand what the latest news means in the ongoing saga over EpiPen Medicaid Drug Rebates, it is important to understand how we got here.   And why at the end of the day, the information Senator Grassley included in the May 31, 2016 release may be less important than the information he hinted at but omitted from the release. Continue Reading The Latest in the Epipen Medicaid Drug Rebate Saga – Where Are We Now?

On May 17, 2017 the American Bar Association convened its 27th National Institute on Health Care Fraud.  I have attended many of the past annual meetings, and always enjoy the presentations and the opportunity to network with colleagues from all sides of the aisle.  And I always come away with a few nuggets to share with those who did not attend.

Here are my seven top takeaways from this year’s Institute. Continue Reading Seven Takeaways from the ABA National Institute On Health Care Fraud

Last week, the Department of Justice (DOJ) entered into a $34 million settlement with Mercy Hospital Springfield (“Hospital”) of Springfield, Missouri, and its affiliate Mercy Clinic (“Clinic”). The settlement resolves an allegation that the Clinic violated the Stark Law by compensating twelve Clinic physicians in a manner that took into account the volume and value of the physicians’ referrals to the Hospital’s infusion center.  The U.S. contended that the defendants’ Stark Law violations caused their reimbursement claims to Medicare for infusion services to violate the False Claims Act. Continue Reading Hospital and its Clinic Agree to $34 Million Settlement to False Claims Act Allegation that Compensation to Oncologists Violated the Stark Law

Patient assistance programs have been a staple within the health care industry for over a decade.  These programs, operated by 503(c)(3) charities, may receive funding from pharmaceutical manufacturers or other providers to offer assistance to low-income patients in affording their medications, copayments, deductibles, premiums, or other related services.   The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) and the Centers of Medicare & Medicare Services (CMS) have acknowledged the role of provider- and manufacturer-supported charitable premium assistance and have established parameters for these charities to operate in compliance with the Anti-Kickback Statute.

Over the last two years, however, government scrutiny and enforcement related to charitable patient assistance programs has increased.   During this time, nearly a dozen pharmaceutical manufacturers and providers have publicly disclosed receipt of government subpoenas investigating their contributions to patient assistance charities.

These new investigations raise a number of questions when it comes to structuring relationships with patient assistance programs.  On May 16th, we will be holding a webinar to review these current investigations and outline what providers, payors, pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs), and pharmacies working with manufacturers and patient assistance programs need to know in light of these investigations.

We hope you join us!  For more information and to register for this webinar, please click here.

In July 2015, we posted about the N.Y. Attorney General’s False Claims Act (FCA) settlements with Trinity HomeCare and its related entities, and how the case provided insight into the future of FCA enforcement.  We identified five key trends based on the settlements:

  1. The FCA cases were based on qui tams and pursued by the State Attorney General after federal government declination.
  2. The FCA cases were based on a narrow, single state or regional arrangement, as opposed to allegations of a national scheme or program.
  3. One of the FCA cases was based on conduct about which Trinity had previously been warned.
  4. The FCA cases were based on government billings for specialty drugs.
  5. All parties to the arrangement were named as defendants in the qui tams.

Trinity was already under investigation by the N.Y. Attorney General’s office for its billing of hemophilia drugs (the basis of the first 2015 settlement) when a second qui tam alleged that Trinity submitted false claims in connection with a specialty drug used to treat premature infants at risk for lung disease.  That second qui tam led to the second settlement and now, almost 20 months later, has led to a new Complaint. Continue Reading Five Trends in False Claims Act Enforcement: Take Two