State Medicaid Agencies have historically engaged in an epic balancing act.  Federal law requires State Medicaid Agencies to ensure beneficiaries have access to medically necessary services.  Federal law also requires State Medicaid Agencies to safeguard their Medicaid Programs against fraud, waste or abuse in billing for Medicaid services.  Balancing those competing requirements has long proven challenging.

Indeed, that very challenge is why federal law also requires State Medicaid Fraud Control Units (MFCUs) be housed outside of the State Medicaid Agencies, and that the State Medicaid Agencies have no authority over which cases the individual MFCUs investigate or prosecute under applicable civil or criminal statutes.  Concerns over access to care should not factor into prosecution judgments in the face of allegations of Medicaid fraud.

No state is more emblematic of the challenges presented by that balancing act than Texas.  But Texas may also be a case study in why use of private Medicaid Management and Medicaid Managed Care companies is no panacea for those challenges.  Moreover, Texas may be a case study in the importance of private Medicaid Management and Medicaid Managed Care companies understanding the depth of those challenges and the need to fully assess what the company may be taking on, before contracting to provide Medicaid services in a particular state. Continue Reading Texas:  A Cautionary Tale for Medicaid Management and Managed Care Companies

This week, focus turns to the Senate as the House overwhelmingly passed its opioid package known as H.R. 6 last week (see our previous coverage here). The Senate will look to combine its various proposals into one package for floor consideration and what passes will provide a timeline for reconciling the House and Senate packages. In other news, the Senate will spend time in the HELP and Finance Committee on drug pricing. With Secretary Azar set to testify, we look for signals that the Administration is moving forward with any aspect of its drug pricing blueprint. We cover this and more in this week’s preview, which you can find here.

Last week, Mintz Levin’s Health Care Enforcement Defense Group published a new Qui Tam Update, which analyzes 60 health care-related False Claims Act qui tam cases unsealed in December 2017 and January 2018 and the trends they reflect:

  • The government intervened in 14% of those unsealed cases (a figure that is consistent with the longer-term trends we have seen over the prior twelve months).
  • Of the 60 unsealed cases, only 28 were being litigated (at least initially). The remaining 32 cases were docketed as closed or dismissed.
  • The 60 unsealed cases were filed in 38 different courts. Jurisdictions with the most unsealed cases included:
    • The Central District of California (which includes Los Angeles) with six cases;
    • The Middle District of Florida (which includes Jacksonville, Orlando, and Tampa) with 4 cases; and
    • The District of Connecticut and Eastern District of Louisiana (New Orleans), each with 3 cases.
  • The most frequently targeted types of defendants included:
    • Pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, and healthcare systems, with each accounting for 9 of the 60 unsealed cases.
    • Physicians and physician group practices, which were targeted in 7 cases.
    • Home health and hospice providers, which were the subject of 6 cases.
    • Outpatient clinics, which were defendants in 5 cases.
  • Former employees were again the most frequent relator type, accounting for 23 of the 60 unsealed cases. Expert witnesses brought 7 cases and current employees brought 2 cases.
  • Only one of the cases was unsealed within the 60-day period specified by statute. That case was under seal for 55 days.
  • The longest time a case was under seal was almost eight-and-a-half years. Average time under seal for this cohort was 700 days, though half of these cases were unsealed in 16 months or less, and 23 of these 60 cases were unsealed in less than a year.

Continue Reading Mintz Levin’s Health Care Enforcement Defense Group Publishes New Qui Tam Update

States may be starting to take aim at prescription automatic refill programs. Automatic refill programs have been proven to increase patient adherence, especially among patients with chronic conditions. However, these programs are not popular among regulators: Medicare Part D and several state boards of pharmacy have prohibited these programs for mail order pharmacies and an increasing number of state Medicaid programs are prohibiting automatic refill programs for both mail and retail pharmacies. Regulators argue that automatic refill programs result in waste to the system, stockpiling, and federal program payment for unneeded prescriptions.

Last week, Wal-Mart and Sam’s Club paid $825,000 to the Minnesota Attorney General and the Department of Justice to settle allegations that they violated the False Claims Act and Minnesota False Claims Act by automatically refilling prescriptions and billing Medicaid without a specific authorization from the patient. These alleged violations appear to be for prescriptions filled at both retail and mail. Continue Reading The Hazards of Prescription Auto-Refill Programs

Recently the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) issued a statement that it had intervened in a False Claims Act (FCA) case against Insys Therapeutics, Inc. and consolidated five separate qui tam cases into one case, U.S. ex rel Guzman v. Insys Therapeutics, Inc., filed in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California. The complaint revealed that multiple states—California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington—as well as the District of Columbia, have also joined the case.

Continue Reading DOJ Continues Aggressive Enforcement Action Against Opioid Manufacturers

The all-too-common story of a healthcare company declaring bankruptcy in the face of aggressive Medicare recoupment actions before the company even has a hearing before an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) may get a new ending – at least in the Fifth Circuit.  Although the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals remanded the case, Family Rehabilitation, Inc. v. Azar, back to the district court and thus it is still too soon to tell the ultimate outcome, it reversed the district court and held that there is jurisdiction for a district court to enjoin CMS recoupment during the administrative appeals process.  This decision is a big win for companies navigating the difficult and seemingly one-sided process of Medicare recoupment actions. Continue Reading Fifth Circuit Decision is Rare Victory Permitting District Court to Enjoin Recoupment Before Provider Exhausts Administrative Remedies

Mintz Levin and ML Strategies will host the 3rd Annual Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Industry Summit on May 8, 2018!  This year’s summit will take place in Boston and we are thrilled to announce that Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker will be the keynote speaker.  The Summit brings together stakeholders and thought leaders to discuss current hot topics facing manufacturers, PBMs, payors, pharmacies, and other providers.  This year’s Summit will include sessions on:

  • The evolving drug supply chain – distruptor models and the Amazon effect
  • Addressing drug pricing and supply chain economics – government investigations and ERISA litigation
  • The uncertain state of the 340B program
  • Government enforcement targeting financial relationships
  • Combatting the opioid crisis

For additional information on the Summit, including the full agenda and registration information, please visit our event website.

Last week, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced that new Medicare cards would be issued starting next month. As we previously reported, the government has been planning to revamp the card to reduce fraud. Medicare cards have historically included a SSN-based Health Insurance Claim Number (HICN) that was an easy target for identity thieves and fraudsters. A new randomly-generated Medicare Beneficiary Identifier (MBI) will replace the HICN on the new cards.

The move to issue new cards was set in motion by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), which requires SSNs to be removed from Medicare identification cards within four years after MACRA’s enactment.

CMS will have a transition period during which either the HICN or the MBI can be used to exchange data with CMS. The transition period is set to begin no earlier than April 1, 2018, and run through December 31, 2019.

For those looking for additional information, CMS has created presentations explaining the card’s impact on different health care industry stakeholders.

Last week, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Massachusetts announced that it had entered into an agreement with a Massachusetts-based medical device manufacturer to settle allegations that the Company had violated the False Claims Act by purchasing lavish meals for physicians to induce them to use heart pumps manufactured by the Company.

The government’s allegations are not particularly novel, but do serve as an important reminder to health care providers and suppliers that it is important to institute, and remain vigilant about, sound compliance practices across all areas of their business.  These allegations also make clear that the government continues to be focused on providers’ and suppliers’ sales and marketing practices. Continue Reading Recent FCA Settlement Shows That What’s Old Is New in Health Care Fraud Enforcement

The Department of Justice (DOJ) recently intervened in a False Claims Act (FCA) case that raises a variety of interesting allegations, including payment of kickbacks by a compounding pharmacy to contracted marketing companies in the form of percentage-based compensation, to TRICARE beneficiaries in the form of copayment waivers, and to physicians who submitted prescriptions without seeing patients.  According to the complaint, Patient Care America (PCA), a Florida compounding pharmacy, implemented a scheme to manipulate the compounding formula for pain and scar creams that resulted in the submission of false claims to TRICARE.  The complaint also names two of PCA’s senior executives (one of which has since left the company) as well as the private equity firm that owns a controlling interest in PCA. Continue Reading DOJ Intervenes in False Claims Act Case Against a Compounding Pharmacy and a Private Equity Firm