The release of the House and Senate GOP tax plan this month has left Washington on edge as it comes to grips with the realities of tax reform. However, the elimination of the medical expense tax deduction in the House Republicans’ tax reform package stands out above the rest as misguided. This elimination would not only affect filers using the deduction, but it also stands to have broader implications for our health care system.

ML Strategies has published a new blog post in Health Affairs on the consequences of the deduction’s removal to the Medicaid program. It can be found here.

As Part of an ongoing series, we have previously provided details on the structure, funding, and evaluation of the Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood, Home Visiting (MIECHV) program, Medicare therapy caps, and community health center funding.  This post marks is the first in an exploratory series illuminating the structure, funding, and outlook of the Special Needs Plans (SNPs).  Additionally, drawing on potential riders affected by the current health care minibus, the “minibus” refers to a handful of policy provisions tied together in one piece of legislation. Undoubtedly, this minibus will carry a number of provisions into law. The number of riders who will be on board when the minibus leaves the station remains to be seen. However, as Congress gears up for a mega-package in December – including the debt limit and the budget – there is the potential to incorporate the minibus and/or a health care stabilization package. Continue Reading Special Needs Plans: A Minibus Rider

Last week, ML Strategies released an Advisory providing a comprehensive review of the sweeping health care legislation recently released by the Massachusetts Senate. The Advisory summarizes the notable provisions contained in the bill, including, among other things, how to handle the rising cost of prescription drugs, hospital reimbursement rates, changes to MassHealth (the Massachusetts Medicaid agency), and commercial insurance market tiering. The bill represents the latest in a series of proposals lawmakers and the Baker administration have made this year aimed at lowering health care costs and improving quality of care. Given the uncertain future of health care at the national level, all eyes will be on Massachusetts as it grapples with these important issues.

Our colleagues at ML Strategies have provided their Health Care Weekly Preview for the week of October 23, 2017. The preview discusses the Alexander-Murray stabilization package introduced by Senators Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and Patty Murray (D-WA), and, in particular, where the stabilization package falls among Congress’ other priorities such as DACA and border security and what we are likely to see next.

 

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) has provided a much anticipated pathway to enable for-profit entities to operate Registered Marijuana Dispensaries (RMDs).  DPH’s Medical Use of Marijuana Program (the “RMD Program”) has released Guidance for Registered Marijuana Dispensaries Regarding Corporate Conversion, pursuant to Section 72 of An Act to Ensure Safe Access to Marijuana (Chapter 55 of the Acts of 2017, or the “2017 Act”), which enables non-profit entities with a Provisional or Final Certificate of Registration to operate a RMD, or current applicants, to convert to a for-profit Massachusetts domestic corporate entity.  Continue Reading Massachusetts DPH Clears the Air for For-Profit Conversion of Medical Marijuana Dispensaries

Correction: An earlier version of this post incorrectly noted that the American Medical Association opposed the rule. The post has been updated to include the AMA’s full statement expressing support for proposed rule. [October 10, 2017]

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (“VA”) is taking a significant step towards expanding needed services to Veterans by proposing a rule to preempt state restrictions on telehealth.

Most states currently restrict providers (including VA employees) from treating patients that are located in that state if the provider is not licensed there. As a result, the VA has had difficulty getting a sufficient number of providers to furnish services via telemedicine for fear that they will face discipline from those states for the unlicensed practice of medicine. Continue Reading Department of Veterans Affairs Aims to Trump State Telemedicine Rules

Our colleagues at ML Strategies have provided their Health Care Weekly Preview for the week of September 18, 2017.  This week’s preview focuses on the prognosis for the Graham-Cassidy bill to block grant ACA funding to states, including potential roadblocks imposed by Senators John McCain (AZ), Susan Collins (ME) and Lisa Murkowski (AK). The Weekly Preview also touches on the discord between Senators Lamar Alexander (TN) and Orrin Hatch (UT), who chair the HELP and Finance committees, respectively.

Our colleagues at ML Strategies have provided their Health Care Weekly Preview for the week of September 11, 2017.  This week’s preview focuses on Congress’ efforts to stabilize the ACA marketplaces, as well as the proposal from Senators Lindsey Graham (SC) and Bill Cassidy (LA) to use block grants to fund Medicaid expansion and private insurance subsidies.

Since our  March 17th post about President Trump’s executive actions aiming to implement his deregulatory agenda, several important developments related to the so-called “2-for-1” Executive Order (E.O. 13,771) have occurred at the Executive Branch management level.  In addition, of great interest to us is the fact that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) took its first major public step toward implementing the goals laid out in the President’s directive. On September 8th, the FDA issued seven Requests for Information that solicit “broad public comment on ways [FDA] can change [its] regulations to achieve meaningful burden reduction while continuing to achieve [its] public health mission and fulfill statutory obligations.” As detailed below, FDA issued one notice for each major product-focused Center, and one specific to cross-cutting agency regulations.

This post outlines the backdrop for–followed by the details of–FDA’s public request for input about which regulations should be cut or modified. Continue Reading FDA Takes First Steps to Cut Regulations, Solicits Public Feedback

In a major public move that has been long-awaited by proponents of evidence-based stem cell science, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb issued a lengthy statement on August 28, 2017 “on the FDA’s new policy steps and enforcement efforts to ensure proper oversight of stem cell therapies and regenerative medicine.” Continue Reading FDA Commissioner Announces Stem Cell Enforcement Shift, Plans to Develop Comprehensive Regenerative Medicine Policies