As Part of an ongoing series, we have previously provided details on the structure, funding, and evaluation of the Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood, Home Visiting (MIECHV) program, Medicare therapy caps, and community health center funding.  This post marks is the first in an exploratory series illuminating the structure, funding, and outlook of the Special Needs Plans (SNPs).  Additionally, drawing on potential riders affected by the current health care minibus, the “minibus” refers to a handful of policy provisions tied together in one piece of legislation. Undoubtedly, this minibus will carry a number of provisions into law. The number of riders who will be on board when the minibus leaves the station remains to be seen. However, as Congress gears up for a mega-package in December – including the debt limit and the budget – there is the potential to incorporate the minibus and/or a health care stabilization package. Continue Reading Special Needs Plans: A Minibus Rider

CMS has completed the 2016 Final Part D Payment Reconciliation. Each Medicare Part D plan sponsor’s reconciliation reports will be available on October 12, 2017.

By way of background, the Medicare Part D reconciliation process is intended to ensure that the federal government pays each Part D plan sponsor appropriately. To arrive at the reconciliation report, CMS : (1) reviews data provided by the plan sponsor and other sources throughout the year, (2) considers what a plan sponsor paid for drugs during the plan year, what direct and indirect remuneration (DIR) a plan sponsor paid to or received from outside parties, and the total value of prospective payments made by CMS to the plan sponsor for the plan year, and (3) determines whether additional money is owed to or from the plan sponsor. Continue Reading CMS Completes Final Medicare Part D Reconciliation for 2016

Last week, a number of health care industry associations sent letters to Congress detailing ways in which the government could relieve them of the burdens associated with “red tape.” The letters are in response to the first stage of a House initiative dubbed the “Medicare Red Tape Relief Project,” which was announced earlier this summer by the House Committee on Ways and Means’ Subcommittee on Health.  Continue Reading Hospitals and Others Respond to “Red Tape Relief Project” Requests

It appears that – at least for now – the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is serving as the public face of the executive branch’s efforts to tackle the increasingly contentious debate about prescription drug prices. As we previously reported, following a May 25, 2017 budget hearing, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has made increased competition in the drug marketplace a high policy priority for the Agency. To that end, we have recently seen concrete steps being taken to advance Dr. Gottlieb’s multi-pronged “Drug Competition Action Plan.” Continue Reading FDA Stays in the Spotlight with Drug Pricing Moves, but Could Be Facing Risk as UFA Bill Loses Attention

On Friday, June 23, 2017, CMS released the Final Medicare Part D DIR Reporting Requirements for 2016.  Part D sponsors may begin submitting their DIR information on June 30, 2017 and must finish their submissions by the end of July 31, 2017.  As explained in our earlier post, CMS publishes Part D DIR Reporting requirements each year and sets the deadline for DIR submissions.

These DIR Reporting Requirements are the first to require Part D plan sponsors to report as DIR price concessions from and additional contingent payments to network pharmacies that could not reasonably be determined at the point of sale.  This change is caused by the update to the definition of “negotiated prices” that was effective January 1, 2016.  Not surprisingly, most of the comments and responses included in CMS’s Reporting Requirements focus on this change.  Additional topics addressed in the comments and responses include, but are not limited to: (i) plan sponsors no longer being able to report negative amounts in the rebate fields, (ii)  the timeliness of the DIR data submitted by July 31, 2017; and (iii) confidentiality of DIR data reported to CMS.

On a sweltering hot D.C. morning, those of us anxiously awaiting the Supreme Court’s opinion in its first case involving biosimilar biological products finally exhaled. The June 12, 2017 opinion followed the parties’ oral arguments on the last day of the Court’s October 2016 Term, as we previously reported. With respect to both of the significant issues presented, the Justices unanimously reversed the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals split opinion and remanded for further consideration of questions related to State law.

Although our intellectual property colleagues have separately analyzed the “Patent Dance” implications of the Court’s decision in Amgen v. Sandoz (see here), the second issue presented in the case related to the proper interpretation of the 180-day notice provision of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (“BPCIA”). The Federal Circuit had held that such notice by the biosimilar applicant can only be provided to the reference product sponsor after FDA licenses (i.e., approves) the biosimilar application.  Continue Reading SCOTUS Ruling Gives a Boost to Biosimilars; FDA Continues to Advance Products Through AdComs

In an opinion written by Judge Posner, the Seventh Circuit on Friday, June 9, 2017, affirmed OSF Saint Francis Medical Center’s summary judgment win in a $300 million antitrust suit brought by a smaller competitor alleging unlawful exclusive dealing and attempted monopolization.  This alert discusses the Court’s decision in this case, which is a notable precedent for hospitals and provider networks — particularly those with substantial market shares — that wish to negotiate narrow and exclusive network agreements with payors.

The latest installment in the ongoing saga over EpiPen Medicaid Drug Rebates came on May 31, 2017, when Senator Charles Grassley issued a press release stating that between 2006-2016 taxpayers may have overpaid for EpiPen by as much as $1.27 billion, “far more” than the announced-but-never-confirmed or finalized $465 million DOJ settlement with Mylan.

To understand what the latest news means in the ongoing saga over EpiPen Medicaid Drug Rebates, it is important to understand how we got here.   And why at the end of the day, the information Senator Grassley included in the May 31, 2016 release may be less important than the information he hinted at but omitted from the release. Continue Reading The Latest in the Epipen Medicaid Drug Rebate Saga – Where Are We Now?

A bipartisan congressional effort is underway to convince CMS to reverse its biosimilar reimbursement policy implemented under the Obama administration. We discussed the current reimbursement policy in a March 2016 blog post when CMS initially released the guidance.  CMS implemented the controversial guidance as a final rule in October 2016.

The current policy requires all biosimilars that are related to a reference product to be given a shared Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) code. For Medicare Part B, reimbursement is then calculated based on the average sales price (ASP) of all of the biosimilars with that HCPCS code plus 6% of their reference product’s ASP. Continue Reading CMS Urged To Reverse Obama-Era Biosimilar Reimbursement Policy

Yesterday, CMS released the Proposed Part D DIR (Direct and Indirect Remuneration) Reporting Requirements for 2016 and postponed the 2016 DIR Reporting deadline.

Each year, CMS releases Proposed Part D DIR Reporting Requirements for interested parties to review and comment on. The DIR Reporting Requirements tend to change slightly from year-to-year as the Part D program has developed and CMS gains further understanding of rebates and price concessions that a Part D plan sponsor may receive or pay.  Additionally, some changes in DIR Reporting Requirements are the result of changes to Part D regulations.  After reviewing the comments, CMS publishes the Final Part D DIR Reporting Requirements, typically in late May, and then plan sponsors submit their DIR Report by June 30th.

These Proposed DIR Reporting Requirements are the first that reflect the change in the definition of “negotiated prices” as set forth at 42 C.F.R. § 423.100. Although the discussion regarding changing the definition of negotiated prices started multiple years ago and was finalized in 2014, the change was not effective until January 1, 2016.  CMS’s proposed changes related to the updated definition of negotiated prices are captured in Summary DIR Report columns DIR #8 and DIR #9.

The deadline for submitting comments is June 2, 2017.

Typically, Part D plan sponsors must submit their DIR reports to CMS by June 30th of the year following the close of the plan year (June 30, 2017 for 2016 DIR).  CMS is postponing the deadline for 2016 DIR submission so that it has time to review the comments it receives and so that Part D plan sponsors have adequate time to analyze and categorize their data in the manner required by the upcoming Final Part D DIR Reporting Requirements.  CMS will announce the 2016 DIR submission deadline in the Final Part D DIR Reporting Requirements for 2016 and it appears that plan sponsors will have approximately 30 days to analyze and categorize their data.