On November 8, 2017, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will hold a workshop entitled, “Understanding Competition in Prescription Drug Markets: Entry and Supply Chain Dynamics.” Acting FTC Chairman Maureen K. Ohlhausen and U.S. Food and Drug Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb will give the keynote addresses. Part of the goal of the workshop is to identify obstacles to competition and discuss policy steps that can increase the availability of generic drugs to consumers.

The Hatch-Waxman Act (the Act), which Congress passed over 30 years ago, provides a regulatory and judicial framework to expedite generic entry into U.S. prescription drug markets. For many drugs, the Act has helped reduce patent-related barriers to generic drug entry, which, in turn, has increased competition that has led to lower drug prices. In 2010, Congress created a similar framework for biosimilar drug development under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act. Continue Reading Federal Trade Commission Announces Workshop on Competition in the Prescription Drug Market

Since our  March 17th post about President Trump’s executive actions aiming to implement his deregulatory agenda, several important developments related to the so-called “2-for-1” Executive Order (E.O. 13,771) have occurred at the Executive Branch management level.  In addition, of great interest to us is the fact that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) took its first major public step toward implementing the goals laid out in the President’s directive. On September 8th, the FDA issued seven Requests for Information that solicit “broad public comment on ways [FDA] can change [its] regulations to achieve meaningful burden reduction while continuing to achieve [its] public health mission and fulfill statutory obligations.” As detailed below, FDA issued one notice for each major product-focused Center, and one specific to cross-cutting agency regulations.

This post outlines the backdrop for–followed by the details of–FDA’s public request for input about which regulations should be cut or modified. Continue Reading FDA Takes First Steps to Cut Regulations, Solicits Public Feedback

In a major public move that has been long-awaited by proponents of evidence-based stem cell science, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb issued a lengthy statement on August 28, 2017 “on the FDA’s new policy steps and enforcement efforts to ensure proper oversight of stem cell therapies and regenerative medicine.” Continue Reading FDA Commissioner Announces Stem Cell Enforcement Shift, Plans to Develop Comprehensive Regenerative Medicine Policies

On August 17, 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that it had reached a $465 million false claims settlement with Mylan, the manufacturer of EpiPen, over the company’s alleged underpayment of Medicaid Drug Rebates for EpiPen. The settlement amount and terms were generally announced by Mylan in October 2016 – but back then DOJ refused to confirm the settlement.

Back in October 2016, we theorized that the announced “settlement” was likely a handshake deal, not yet reduced to writing and not signed off on by the necessary parties.  It’s not surprising that it would take ten months to finalize a health care false claims settlement.  In Ellyn’s government days, she worked cases that took years, not months, to get from handshake deal to announced settlement.

And in reviewing the EpiPen settlement and related unsealed documents, there were things we expected to see in the settlement; admittedly we are grizzled veterans when it comes to false claims settlements.  But there were some things about this settlement that raised our eyebrows. So we will (briefly) recap how we got here and the settlement terms, and discuss the four things that surprised us about this settlement.  Continue Reading The Four Things That Surprised Us in the EpiPen False Claims Settlement

Picking up from my last installment of this series exploring the regulatory history of off-label communication, this post highlights some recent trends in FDA enforcement and guidance related to off-label promotion.  Not surprisingly, FDA has taken a hard-line approach in its guidance on off-label communications, similar to the Agency’s forceful January 2017 memo. This aggressive stance has not, however, translated into increased enforcement. Continue Reading The Past, Present, and Future of Government Regulation of Off-Label Communications – Part 4

It has been some time since we provided a detailed update on the status of FDA’s user fee legislation making its way through Congress, so that’s what is on tap for today. The House passed the lengthy FDA Reauthorization Act (FDARA) on July 13, 2017 as H.R. 2430, and House members have now left Washington, D.C. for the traditional August recess.

Although the previous self-imposed congressional deadline of completing work on FDARA by the end of July has passed, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb informed agency employees via email on July 24th that he would not be sending out any lay-off notices to user fee-funded staff “unless and until September 30 passes without reauthorization.” The publicizing of this policy decision by the Commissioner may have been intended to signal to the Senate that the sky is not falling (yet), but that they need to get to work.  Continue Reading August 2017 Is Here – Will FDARA Get Done Soon?

Continuing its annual tradition, the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) announced last week the largest ever health care fraud enforcement action by the Medicare Fraud Strike Force.  As part of the national health care fraud takedown, the government charged 412 defendants with approximately $1.3 billion in alleged fraud. In addition to these charges, HHS Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) is in the process of excluding 295 health care providers from participating in federal health care programs.

Continue Reading DOJ and OIG Announce Largest Ever National Health Care Fraud Takedown; Focus on Opioids

Facing pressure from stakeholders and technological realities, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has again delayed its enforcement of parts of the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA). As we discussed in a prior post, the DSCSA requires enhanced security and accountability for prescription drugs throughout the U.S. pharmaceutical supply chain, with phased-in obligations for the various trading partners over 10 years, beginning with the law’s passage in November 2013. Covered trading partners include manufacturers, repackagers, wholesale distributors, and dispensers, whose upcoming compliance obligations under the DSCSA are all addressed by FDA in the recently issued Compliance Policy guidance documentContinue Reading FDA Delays Enforcement of Prescription Drug Product Identifier and Related Requirements

It appears that – at least for now – the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is serving as the public face of the executive branch’s efforts to tackle the increasingly contentious debate about prescription drug prices. As we previously reported, following a May 25, 2017 budget hearing, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has made increased competition in the drug marketplace a high policy priority for the Agency. To that end, we have recently seen concrete steps being taken to advance Dr. Gottlieb’s multi-pronged “Drug Competition Action Plan.” Continue Reading FDA Stays in the Spotlight with Drug Pricing Moves, but Could Be Facing Risk as UFA Bill Loses Attention

Earlier this month, two states – Maryland and Nevada – passed legislation aimed at controlling drug prices. The two laws are being touted by proponents as decisive action against pharmaceutical manufacturers. Opponents note that the laws have limitations and are really more of an annoyance for drug makers and will not do anything to help patients access or afford their medicines. Notably, both measures were enacted without the governors’ signatures (who are both Republican) but neither governor vetoed the legislation.

Continue Reading Drug Makers Not Off the Hook as States Continue to Take Action to Control Drug Prices