Many provisions of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) have been the subject of litigation over the last decade, with several high-profile Supreme Court cases including: NFIB v. Sebelius, King v. Burwell, and Burwell v. Hobby Lobby. One of the more overlooked topics of litigation has been the ACA’s “Risk Corridors” program. This has recently changed because a decision is anticipated in the consolidated appeal of two important risk corridors cases currently pending in a federal appeals court. Continue Reading Decision Expected Soon in Ongoing Risk Corridors Litigation

To date, 34 states (including D.C.) have adopted Medicaid expansion. Of the remaining 17 states, some are considering expanding Medicaid. States with recent activity relating to Medicaid expansion include Florida, Idaho, Maine, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Utah, and Virginia.  Last week, Virginia became the latest state to expand Medicaid and also tied a Medicaid work requirement to the expansion. California is also exploring expanding Medicaid to undocumented adults.

Below we have highlighted recent state grassroots, legislative, and executive action to expand Medicaid. Continue Reading A Rundown of Recent State Action Relating to Medicaid Expansion

Last week, ML Strategies released an Advisory providing a comprehensive review of the Republican’s efforts this past year to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.   The Advisory, published September 22, 2017, walks through the evolution of the Republican’s efforts beginning with the American Health Care Act and ending with an analysis of the Graham-Cassidy bill, which died in the Senate earlier this week.  With the Republican’s commitment to get something called “repeal and replace” passed, we expect these efforts will continue.  Understanding this evolution may provide insight on where we could be headed.

 

Over the past month, we provided additional details on the structure, funding, and evaluation of the Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood, Home Visiting (MIECHV) program and Medicare Therapy Caps. In this post we will go into detail on the structure, funding, and outlook of the “primary care cliff,” and specifically the three programs relating to community health centers. This is part of an ongoing series we are doing on the potential riders of a health care minibus. The “minibus” refers to a handful of policy provisions tied together in one piece of legislation. This minibus will carry a number of provisions into law, although the number of riders onboard the minibus, and when the minibus leaves the station, remains to be seen.  Continue Reading Community Health Center Fund: A Minibus Rider

Our colleagues on the Employment Matters blog have been following Massachusetts’ efforts to make up a funding shortfall in the Commonwealth’s Medicaid program and its Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Back in May, they blogged on the two options introduced by the Senate to offset these rising costs: (1) a “play-or-pay” option that would impose a per employee assessment on companies that do not offer their workers’ health plans, or (2) an across the board increase in the Employer Medical Assistance Contribution (or “EMAC”).

Last week, they provided an update on the Commonwealth’s effort. On August 1, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker signed into law H. 3822, “An Act Further Regulating Employer Contributions to Health Care” (the “Act”). This Act (i) increases the Employer Medical Assistance Contribution (“EMAC”) from an annual maximum fee of $51 per employee to $77 per employee; and (ii) imposes a penalty on employers of up to $750 for each non-disabled worker who receives health insurance coverage through MassHealth or the Massachusetts Health Connector (i.e., the Commonwealth’s Affordable Care Act marketplace).

Read their full update here.

Our colleagues at ML Strategies have provided their Health Care Weekly Preview for the week of July 31, 2017.  This week’s preview focuses on the fallout from the failed vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), including the issue of whether the federal government will continue to pay cost-sharing reduction subsidies (CSRs), as well a new proposal by Senators Lindsey Graham (SC), Bill Cassidy (LA) and Dean Heller (NV).

Congress returns from its Memorial Day recess to four full weeks of legislative activity. The drama of the American Health Care Act (AHCA) now hangs over the Senate. The House will return to its regular work once they advance the FDA User Fee Reauthorization, with the Senate also having to schedule floor time for the package. Also on our radar this month will be the date June 21st– the date in which insurers decide if they will participate in the Obamacare Marketplace for 2018. This could play a role in the Administration’s ongoing discussions regarding cost-sharing reductions, as well as how the Senate approaches its version of the AHCA. Continue Reading Congress Returns for June Session to Face AHCA, User Fees and More

Our ML Strategies colleagues, Eli GreenspanKatie Weider, and Rodney Whitlock, have published a new edition of the Health Care Weekly Preview.

This edition covers upcoming hearings in the House, including one before the House Ways & Means Committee regarding expiring Medicare programs, as well as changes to Medicare’s payment system.  It also covers an upcoming hearing before the Senate Finance Committee regarding The (CHRONIC) Care Act of 2017, which has been co-sponsored by Democrats and Republicans.

The ML Strategies team also comments on the possibility of a bipartisan bill designed to fix the Affordable Care Act.

Click HERE to read this week’s edition and stay tuned for additional Previews!