States may be starting to take aim at prescription automatic refill programs. Automatic refill programs have been proven to increase patient adherence, especially among patients with chronic conditions. However, these programs are not popular among regulators: Medicare Part D and several state boards of pharmacy have prohibited these programs for mail order pharmacies and an increasing number of state Medicaid programs are prohibiting automatic refill programs for both mail and retail pharmacies. Regulators argue that automatic refill programs result in waste to the system, stockpiling, and federal program payment for unneeded prescriptions.

Last week, Wal-Mart and Sam’s Club paid $825,000 to the Minnesota Attorney General and the Department of Justice to settle allegations that they violated the False Claims Act and Minnesota False Claims Act by automatically refilling prescriptions and billing Medicaid without a specific authorization from the patient. These alleged violations appear to be for prescriptions filled at both retail and mail. Continue Reading The Hazards of Prescription Auto-Refill Programs

In July 2015, we posted about the N.Y. Attorney General’s False Claims Act (FCA) settlements with Trinity HomeCare and its related entities, and how the case provided insight into the future of FCA enforcement.  We identified five key trends based on the settlements:

  1. The FCA cases were based on qui tams and pursued by the State Attorney General after federal government declination.
  2. The FCA cases were based on a narrow, single state or regional arrangement, as opposed to allegations of a national scheme or program.
  3. One of the FCA cases was based on conduct about which Trinity had previously been warned.
  4. The FCA cases were based on government billings for specialty drugs.
  5. All parties to the arrangement were named as defendants in the qui tams.

Trinity was already under investigation by the N.Y. Attorney General’s office for its billing of hemophilia drugs (the basis of the first 2015 settlement) when a second qui tam alleged that Trinity submitted false claims in connection with a specialty drug used to treat premature infants at risk for lung disease.  That second qui tam led to the second settlement and now, almost 20 months later, has led to a new Complaint. Continue Reading Five Trends in False Claims Act Enforcement: Take Two