On August 17, 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that it had reached a $465 million false claims settlement with Mylan, the manufacturer of EpiPen, over the company’s alleged underpayment of Medicaid Drug Rebates for EpiPen. The settlement amount and terms were generally announced by Mylan in October 2016 – but back then DOJ refused to confirm the settlement.

Back in October 2016, we theorized that the announced “settlement” was likely a handshake deal, not yet reduced to writing and not signed off on by the necessary parties.  It’s not surprising that it would take ten months to finalize a health care false claims settlement.  In Ellyn’s government days, she worked cases that took years, not months, to get from handshake deal to announced settlement.

And in reviewing the EpiPen settlement and related unsealed documents, there were things we expected to see in the settlement; admittedly we are grizzled veterans when it comes to false claims settlements.  But there were some things about this settlement that raised our eyebrows. So we will (briefly) recap how we got here and the settlement terms, and discuss the four things that surprised us about this settlement.  Continue Reading The Four Things That Surprised Us in the EpiPen False Claims Settlement

On July 18, 2017, just days after CMS went public with its proposal to reduce Medicare Part B reimbursement to certain 340B covered entities, Congress held its first hearing on 340B Program Oversight since March 2015.  A common thread ran through the testimony of the three testifying witnesses:  Erin Bliss, Assistant Inspector General with HHS-OIG; Dr. Debra Draper, Director of Health Care at the GAO; and, Captain Krista Pedley, Director of the Office of Pharmacy Affairs at HRSA:  Congress needs to legislatively grant HRSA more administrative authority over the 340B Drug Discount Program.  Continue Reading Witnesses at Congressional Hearing on 340B Urge Congress To Give HRSA Broader Regulatory Authority

Continuing its annual tradition, the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) announced last week the largest ever health care fraud enforcement action by the Medicare Fraud Strike Force.  As part of the national health care fraud takedown, the government charged 412 defendants with approximately $1.3 billion in alleged fraud. In addition to these charges, HHS Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) is in the process of excluding 295 health care providers from participating in federal health care programs.

Continue Reading DOJ and OIG Announce Largest Ever National Health Care Fraud Takedown; Focus on Opioids

Earlier this month, the Office of the Inspector General for the Department of Health and Human Services (“OIG”) published its Semiannual Report to Congress covering the period from October 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017.  The report describes OIG’s work and accomplishments during the 6-month reporting period. Like other OIG reports, including the annual OIG Work Plan, the report gives a good indication of priority areas for OIG and can help guide compliance priorities for providers.  Below are some highlights of the report in the following focus areas: Continue Reading OIG Publishes Semiannual Report to Congress

For several years now, the public outcry over the issue of drug pricing and reimbursement has increased in frequency and fervor.   At least one government agency wants you to know that it has been listening and wants to help provide the information necessary to forge a solution.

On Friday February 17, 2017, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Inspector General (OIG) issued an Online Portfolio on Drug Pricing and Reimbursement, pulling together OIG’s body of work related to drug pricing and reimbursement in HHS programs, including Medicaid and Medicare, since 2010.  Continue Reading OIG Publishes Online Portfolio Highlighting its Body of Work on Drug Pricing and Reimbursement

Earlier today, my colleagues Tom Crane and Larry Freedman released a Health Care Enforcement Defense Advisory regarding the Supreme Court’s long-awaited, unanimous decision in Universal Health Services v. United States ex rel. Escobar (“Escobar”). As they discuss in detail, the Court ruled that under certain circumstances the theory of “implied false certification” can give rise to liability under the False Claims Act (“FCA”).

The Court explained that FCA liability can attach when (1) “the claim does not merely request payment, but also makes specific representations about the goods or services provided,” and (2) the defendant’s “failure to disclose noncompliance with material statutory, regulatory, or contractual requirements makes those representations misleading half-truths.”  However, the Court also limited the scope of the FCA  by imposing a “rigorous” and “demanding” standard of materiality.

For more information and a discussion on what this decision might mean for health care enforcement defense, please click here.

The OIG recently issued a favorable advisory opinion permitting a health system (the “Health System”) to become the sole owner of a Group Purchasing Organization (“GPO”), some of whose members were also owned by the Health System (the “Proposed Arrangement”).

Despite determining that the Proposed Arrangement does not qualify for protection under the GPO safe harbor, the OIG considered whether allowing the GPO to be wholly owned by the same entity that also owns almost 1% of the member pool increases the risk of fraud and abuse to Federal health care programs.

The GPO Structure

The GPO has over 84,000 members nationwide, many of which are hospitals, nursing facilities, clinics, physician practices, laboratories, home care, and equipment organizations. It operates by negotiating products and pricing with vendors on behalf of its members and receives administrative fees from the vendors based on a percentage of the value of sales to the members.  The GPO provides annual written disclosures to the members regarding purchases made on behalf of each member and maintains records regarding discounts and vendor administrative fee distributions to members.

The Proposed Arrangement

To increase efficiencies, the GPO underwent a series of mergers and stock sales (not at issue here), after which the Health System owned 95% of the GPO, with an unrelated entity owning the remaining 5%. About 800 of the 84,000 members (just under 1%) are owned by the Health System.  Under the Proposed Arrangement, the Health System would purchase the remaining 5% of the GPO to become the sole owner. Continue Reading OIG Issues Favorable GPO Advisory Opinion

Earlier today, Attorney General Loretta Lynch announced the largest coordinated crackdown in the Medicare Fraud Strike Force’s eight-year history.  The government brought charges against 243 individuals for approximately $712 million in alleged Medicare fraud.

The government alleges a wide array of misconduct ranging from conspiracy to commit health-care fraud, violations of the Anti-Kickback Statute, money laundering, and aggravated identity theft. The individuals charged include doctors, nurses, patient recruiters, home health care providers, pharmacy owners, and other license medical professionals. Notably, almost 50 of these individuals were charged with fraud related to the Medicare prescription drug benefit program (“Part D”).

Continue Reading Government Announces Health Care Fraud “Takedown”

The Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) recently released its Semiannual Report to Congress (“Report”), summarizing OIG’s activities for the six-month period ending on March 31, 2015.

The Report highlights OIG’s accomplishments over the first half of FY 2015, including OIG’s expected recoveries of over $1.8 billion, comprised of approximately $544.7 million in audit receivables and $1.26 billion in investigative receivables. Over the same period, OIG reported 486 criminal actions against individuals and entities that engaged in crimes against HHS programs and 326 civil actions, including false claims cases, unjust-enrichment lawsuits, civil monetary penalties settlements, and administrative recoveries related to provider self-disclosure matters. OIG also reported exclusions of 1,735 individuals and entities from participation in Federal health care programs.

Continue Reading OIG Releases Semiannual Report to Congress

Last week I attended the American Health Lawyers Association Institute on Medicare and Medicaid Payment Issues in Baltimore, Maryland. Taking a comprehensive approach to reimbursement issues, the program offered a variety of sessions ranging from Medicare and Medicaid program fundamentals to areas of highly-specific technical expertise. Conference faculty included speakers from all parts of the health care regulatory system, including two of my colleagues, Thomas S. Crane and Ellyn Sternfield.

Many of the sessions focused on government regulation and enforcement initiatives and trends related to Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement. Throughout the entire meeting, three themes emerged that are of particular interest:

  1. Data, Data, Data!

Speakers focused on the government’s use of data-driven analysis to identify and predict areas of potential fraud. This discussion confirmed our predictions that the increasing availability of health care claims and payment data and availability of Medicare billing data may lead to increased government and private health care scrutiny, enforcement, and litigation. Government speakers emphasized the use of a multitude of data sources to identify outliers and investigate potential fraud or abuse.

Continue Reading 3 Key Take Aways from AHLA’s Institute on Medicare and Medicaid Payment Issues