Medicaid Drug Rebate Program

On August 17, 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that it had reached a $465 million false claims settlement with Mylan, the manufacturer of EpiPen, over the company’s alleged underpayment of Medicaid Drug Rebates for EpiPen. The settlement amount and terms were generally announced by Mylan in October 2016 – but back then DOJ refused to confirm the settlement.

Back in October 2016, we theorized that the announced “settlement” was likely a handshake deal, not yet reduced to writing and not signed off on by the necessary parties.  It’s not surprising that it would take ten months to finalize a health care false claims settlement.  In Ellyn’s government days, she worked cases that took years, not months, to get from handshake deal to announced settlement.

And in reviewing the EpiPen settlement and related unsealed documents, there were things we expected to see in the settlement; admittedly we are grizzled veterans when it comes to false claims settlements.  But there were some things about this settlement that raised our eyebrows. So we will (briefly) recap how we got here and the settlement terms, and discuss the four things that surprised us about this settlement.  Continue Reading The Four Things That Surprised Us in the EpiPen False Claims Settlement

On Monday, ML Strategies (MLS) posted its weekly Health Care Update, which provides information from the previous week on a variety of important health care-related topics like implementation of the Affordable Care Act, Congressional initiatives affecting the health care industry, and state and federal health regulatory developments.

In this week’s Update, MLS highlights two major developments for prescription drug manufacturers (among other topics):

  1.  the Medicaid Outpatient Drug Rule went to the White House’s Office of Management and Budget for final review; and
  2.  a federal district court judge ruled in Amarin Pharma, Inc. v. FDA that a drug manufacturer could market to health care professionals off-label uses for a prescription drug provided the manufacturer’s statements were truthful and non-misleading.

The Medicaid Outpatient Drug Rule could set standards for the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program and also provides for significant changes to what is and is not included in the Average Manufacturer Price (AMP) calculation, as well as how “best price” would be calculated for rebates.  Modifying the AMP calculation for the Medicaid program appears to be a priority for Congress, as the House also expressed interest in this issue when it passed the 21st Century Cures Act.

The Amarin Pharma decision is another significant victory for the drug industry (following the 2012 United States v. Caronia decision that drug manufacturers should be allowed to share and discuss with providers materials that support off-label claims).  Industry stakeholders must now wait to see how the FDA will react to Amarin Pharma and whether it will apply the decision in its off-label oversight framework.

To access past MLS Health Care Updates click here.