It has been a few months since we reported on Federal Court wranglings with the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act, or BPCIA, which created the nation’s abbreviated marketing pathway for biosimilar products.

After the Supreme Court issued its first ruling on the BPCIA in June 2017 (see our prior post here), it sent the dispute between Amgen and Sandoz back to the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals to resolve the question of whether Amgen’s claims asserted under California law, including a claim of unfair competition, were preempted under the BPCIA. Continue Reading Biosimilar Market Developments Continue Apace in 2018

Rules for clinical research are undergoing major changes in both the United States and the European Union. In the United States, the 21st Century Cures Act, which was signed into law on December 13, 2016, creates a new paradigm for modern trial design and clinical evidence development, and the Department of Health and Human Services has proposed significant revisions to the Common Rule, which governs human subject research. In the European Union, imminent changes to the clinical trial regulation No. 536/2014 and general data protection regulation could substantially impact the administration of clinical trials in European countries. The changes will greatly affect the conduct of clinical trials by sponsors and clinical researchers all over the world.

To find out more about these changes and how to address them in your trials, join our two-part upcoming webinar, “Conducting Multi-Jurisdictional Trials: Understanding Changes in the US and EU.” The first part, on January 24 at 11 AM EST, will feature Bethany Hills, Dianne Bourque, and Benjamin Zegarelli from Mintz Levin’s FDA practice group, who will share insights on changes that will impact the design and conduct of clinical trials in the US. The second part, on February 7 at 11 AM EST, will feature Laura Liguori and Elisa Stefanini from Portolano Cavallo, who will cover the important changes to clinical trial administration in the EU and Italy.

Register now!

I previously said that the year 2014 may be a game-changer for the 340B Drug Discount Program. Increasing HRSA audits, a lawsuit over the 340B Orphan Drug Rule, and HRSA’s promise to issue a 340B mega-regulation, all pointed to major changes in how the 340B Program operates.  However, the HRSA audits had limited effect, the court invalidated the Orphan Drug Rule, and the reverberations of the Orphan Drug litigation killed the 340B mega-regulation.

January 2018 began with a new 340B reimbursement rule and new litigation over that rule posing a very real threat to how hospitals use 340B drugs.  Then Congress issued a formal Report on legislative and regulatory modifications needed in the 340B Program.  Will 2018 finally be the game-changing year for 340B? Continue Reading This Year May be a Game Changer for 340B Drug Discount Program, Take Two

Congress has four days to fund the government. The emerging spending deal could include any number of legislative priorities. We wait and see for signs that a spending deal is close before we start envisioning what a short-term continuing resolution might look like. Both sides will have to agree in order to avoid the shutdown. We also will be following the Senate Finance Committee as it votes to advance the nomination of Alex Azar to the full Senate for consideration. You can read about this and more in our health care preview.

Today is the deadline for interested parties to submit comments to CMS regarding the proposed contract year 2019 Medicare Advantage and Part D regulations.  The proposed rule focuses on many issues.  In addition to the changes that CMS formally proposes, CMS has also included a request for information. CMS often uses a “request for information” in order to gain insight on an issue so that it can decide whether to formally make proposed changes relating to the issue in the future.  CMS’s request for information relates to the application of manufacturer rebates and pharmacy price concessions to drug prices at the point of sale.  CMS has been gathering information regarding these topics for many years.  You can read more here, here, here, and here.

CMS asks stakeholders to comment on CMS’s proposal: (a) to require that a percentage of manufacturer rebates be passed through at the point of sale, and (b) to require pharmacy price concessions (such as performance-based pharmacy adjustments) be reflected at the point of sale.  CMS specifically requests that all commenters provide quantitative analytical support for their responses wherever possible. Continue Reading In Proposed Regulations CMS Requests Information on Changes to Part D Negotiated Prices

On January 11, 2018, CMS released a Letter to Medicaid Directors outlining guidance that work requirements can be used as a basis for eligibility for certain adult Medicaid beneficiaries through 1115 waivers. Medicaid beneficiaries that can be subject to work requirements include non-elderly, non-pregnant adult Medicaid beneficiaries who are eligible for Medicaid on a basis other than disability. The guidance also outlines that exemptions/protections from work requirements must be made for individuals who are medically frail or have substance use disorders. It also details that states should outline how they would support beneficiaries with limited employment opportunities (economically depressed area, rural area, transportation limitations, etc.). The guidance suggests state could use good cause exemptions similar to those used in SNAP and TANF. Continue Reading CMS Guidance on Work Requirements for Medicaid Eligibility

On January 9th, the Senate Committee on Finance conducted its nomination hearing of Alex Michael Azar II, President Trump’s nominee for Secretary of Health and Human Services. Under President George W. Bush, Mr. Azar served in HHS, first as general counsel to HHS and then as deputy secretary. Mr. Azar was more recently an executive at Eli Lilly and Company. As summarized here, Mr. Azar received many questions regarding Medicaid, CHIP, the Affordable Care Act, and most notably and often, drug prices. Continue Reading Azar’s Nomination Hearing Highlights Medicare Negotiation of Part B Drug Prices

The Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General (OIG) has issued an Advisory Opinion (Opinion) in connection with a hospital’s gainsharing arrangement (Arrangement) with a designated group of neurosurgeons who perform spinal fusion surgeries at the hospital. According to the Opinion, the OIG would not impose sanctions because the Arrangement, when viewed in its entirety, is not designed or likely to induce the neurosurgeons to (i) reduce or limit medically necessary services to their Medicare or Medicaid patients, or (ii) increase referrals to the hospital. This Opinion is the latest in a line of earlier advisory opinions to “bless” gainsharing arrangements that meet certain criteria for minimizing the risk of fraud and abuse. Continue Reading OIG Reaffirms Permissibility of Certain Gainsharing Arrangements

This week, Congress returns to D.C. with 11 days to pass a government funding bill that may touch on issues such as CHIP, the minibus, DACA, and disaster relief. How this all comes together by January 19th will start to play out this week. Meanwhile, the Senate Finance Committee will consider the nomination of Alex Azar to be the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). We cover that and more in our preview, which can be found here.

In both civil and criminal enforcement proceedings, 2017 was perhaps most notable for the cases brought against individual health care providers and small physician practice owners.  Among the factors that may have resulted in the uptick in cases against individuals are the Yates Memo issued in late 2015, improved and increased reliance on sophisticated data analytics, and the aggressive focus on opioid addiction and its causes. Continue Reading Health Care Enforcement Review and 2018 Outlook: Criminal and Civil Enforcement Trends